Bibliographies

What is a bibliography?
A bibliography is an alphabetical list of the sources – books, newspapers, journals, DVDs, Internet, interviews, etc. – that have been used to prepare a piece of work.

Why write bibliographies?
To acknowledge the sources used.
To give readers information to identify and consult the sources used.
To make sure the information is accurate.

What if a bibliography is not included?
The writer may be accused of plagiarism (that is, stealing another person’s idea or writing).

Examples on how to cite various resources, both print and online, are shown below.

SLASA Online Referencing Generator

The SLASA Online Referencing Generator is now available for all students to use.  It has 3 template formats for Junior, Middle, Senior students and you are able to quickly fill the citation information fields as you do your research.  The ORG then gathers the required information from external databases and formats it ready to generate a bibliography for inclusion in your work.   It’s quick, simple and easy to understand – no more wondering how to get the information required and how to set it out – and no excuses!

SLASA Online Referencing Generator

 

 

 

http://www.slasa.asn.au/org/

 

There are a number of other online bibliographic tools that are also able to provide examples of how to cite references within the body of your work.  The following are examples of online bibliographic tools:

BIBMEwww.bibme.org
EASYBIBwww.easybib.com

 

BIBLIOGRAPHIC EXAMPLES

Books

  • Name of author/s (surname, first names)
  • Year of publication (followed by a comma)
  • Title of book (italics)
  • Publisher (followed by a comma)
  • Place of publication (followed by a full stop)

If there is no author then use Title of book, followed by Year of publication, Publisher and Place of publication.

Examples:
Adams-Smith, Patsy 2008, The ANZACS Melbourne University Press, London.
Hutchings, M. and Thornton, C. 2001, How to recover from anorexia and other eating disorders Hale and Iremonger, Alexandria, NSW.
Rice, grains and beans 2002, J.B. Fairfax, Sydney.

Emails

  • Name of author/s (surname, first names)
  • Year of publication or n.d. [no date] (followed by a comma)
  • Subject line of email document (in italics and inverted commas, followed by a comma)
  • Personal email (in brackets followed by a comma)
  • Author’s email address (underlined and on one line only)
  • Date of access (then full stop)

If there is no author then use, Subject line of email, followed by Year, (Personal email), Author’s email address and Date of access.

Examples:
Fraser, Lynn 2010, ‘Megan’s dance’, (Personal email), lfraser@dragon.net.au accessed 6 August 2010
‘Golden days’ (Personal email), mswannell@dragon.net.au accessed 6 August 2010

Internet Documents

  • Name of author/s (surname, first names)
  • Year of publication or n.d. [no date] (followed by a comma)
  • Title of document (in italics and inverted commas, followed by comma)
  • Internet (in brackets followed by comma)
  • Full URL [address] (underlined, on one line only)
  • Date of access (then full stop)

If there is no author then use Title of document, followed by Year, (Internet), full URL and Date of access.

Example:
‘Copying licenced by CAL’
n.d., (Internet), www.copyright.com.au accessed 7 July 2006.

Journal and Magazine Articles

  • Name of author/s (surname, first names)
  • Year of publication (followed by a comma)
  • Title of article (in italics and inverted commas, followed by a comma)
  • Title of journal or magazine (underlined, followed by a comma)
  • Volume number and/or date and month of publication (followed by a comma)
  • Issue or part number (followed by a comma)
  • Page number/s (then full stop)

Examples:
Hetherington, Nicole 2007, ‘Welcome to Australia: the shape of society’, Women’s fitness and sport, vol.7, no.7, pp.56-59
Motluk, Allison 2001, ‘Born under a thin star’, New Scientist, 11 August, p.6

Newspaper Articles

  • Name of author/s (surname, first names)
  • Year of publication (followed by a comma)
  • Title of article (in italics and inverted commas, followed by comma)
  • Title of newspaper (underlined, followed by comma)
  • Day of publication (followed by comma)
  • Page number/s (then full stop)

If there is no author then use Title of article, followed by Year of publication, Title of newspaper, Day of publication and page number.

Examples:
Amjadali, Samantha 2006, ‘Copyright maladies’, Sunday Herald-Sun, Sunday May 6, p.90
‘Music’s sour note’ 2006, Herald-Sun, Friday April 7, p.21

Online Images

  • Title of image, or a description (in italics and inverted commas)
  • Year of publication or n.d. [no date] (followed by a comma)
  • Online image (in brackets followed by comma)
  • Full URL [address] (underlined and on one line only)
  • Date of access (then full stop)

Example:
‘Cliff.jpg
‘ 2004, (Online image), www.freeexpression.org/mar06/cliff.jpg accessed 25 February 2005

Online Reference Sources

  • Title of article (in italics and inverted commas followed by comma)
  • Year of publication or n.d. [no date] (followed by a comma)
  • Title of online reference source (underlined followed by comma)
  • Online reference (in brackets followed by comma)
  • Full URL [address] (underlined and on one line only)
  • Date of access (then full stop)

Example:
‘Jumping jacks’
2009, Microsoft Encarta, (Online reference), http://encarta.msn.com accessed 15 March

Personal communications

  • Name of author/s (surname, first names)
  • Year of communication (followed by a comma)
  • Pers.Comm. (in brackets followed by comma)
  • Location of person/organisation (then full stop)

Example:
Flattery, W. 2011, (Pers.Comm.), Canadian Bay Road, Mount Eliza, Victoria.

 

 

 

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